Archived Facts

Posts Tagged ‘Economic’

Beverly Hills, CA (PRWEB) December 26, 2007

GYN GLOBAL, Inc. announced the launch of its power house physicians’ marketing and specialized cosmetic surgical training portfolio aimed at increasing a physician’s fame, client base, cash flow and quality of life.

At the helm of the Gyn Global enterprise, Founder and Managing Director, Rhonda Coleman, also known as the Beautefessional, is poised to dominate the healthcare industry. Coleman has tapped into the multi-billion dollar business of beauty and created a niche by delivering the perfect prescription to cure what ails physicians around the globe.

Gyn Global has seven main subsidiaries: The Gyn Global Institute, Med Media Agency, Med Practice Pros, Next Level Suite, Doctors Image, Doctors Meet Investors and Beautefessionals.

The Gyn Global Institute offers preceptorship training for physicians in vaginal rejuvenation, cosmetic surgery and pelvic reconstruction. According to the ASPS there was a sharp increase and demand with over 17 million plastic surgery procedures being performed in the U.S. from 2006 to 2007. Physicians from various specialties are flocking to Gyn Global Institute to train. Beefing up their skill set is Rx for success. The remarkably affordable fees for these courses range from $ 1000 to $ 25,000. There are group and individualized instruction packages available for physicians. The Institute’s instructors are simply the best in the business. Most courses fulfill the CME credit requirements.

“More importantly our instructors teach other physicians a valuable skill set without price gouging for the training. Just because some docs have made it to the top doesn’t mean its ethical or sound to impose ridiculous restraints such as restricted ‘territories’, non competition clauses, cookie cutter – twin brother branding or other unreasonable limitations. Gyn Global has a vested interest in branding our physician client , increasing their client base, their cash flow and their quality of life by taking their business to the next level. Gyn Global epitomizes the behind the scenes, top doc super team! Our team drives the client to achieve personal and professional excellence. The goal is to get our clients to their own personal super bowl. We don’t have to steal their thunder and be the center of attention. The spotlight is and rightfully so shall always be on the physician client and never the instructor nor the company behind the genius physician. Gyn Global never forgets that we earn our living from these physicians that pay us for services. If we elect to accept a client we are going to go above and beyond each and every day. We’ll be in the trenches doing the tough work to make our client #1. ” says Coleman.

Physicians who want a piece of the multi billion dollar biz of beauty prosperity pie are going global while eagerly retaining the Beverly Hills based firm. Other Gyn Global services include physician, med spa, healthcare and cosmetic surgery marketing, web design, development, seo, event planning, red carpet vip access , paid public speaking, product endorsement , television, film, radio opportunities, media placement, doctors image consulting and packaging.

Gyn Global has partnered with the elite who’s who from a cross section of industries including the beauty, medical, legal, entertainment, media, advertising, publishing, public relations, and technology fields to insure the client’s success.

Rhonda Coleman’s past accomplishments led her to manage the careers of many high-profile entertainers, professional athletes, celebrities and supermodels. For the past 10 years, Rhonda has dedicated herself to physician consulting. She now personally manages an elite group of America’s most successful physicians, overseeing their public speaking, spokesperson, product endorsement, literary, scientific, philanthropic and entertainment career opportunities.

Coleman hails from a family of renown ivy league physicians, philanthropists and celebrities. She has dedicated her life to physician legacy management, a top tier consultancy service that transforms physicians into genius medical pioneers, global contributors and household names.

The firm has recruited the best of the best in the business, currently operating with an in house staff of over a dozen executive directors including five top physicians specializing in gynecology, cosmetic surgery, dermatology, plastic surgery and breast surgery.

Coleman intends to carve out market share with an innovative business model, highly guarded trade secrets, insider knowledge, proprietary technology, a platinum rolodex, esteemed sponsors, brilliant legal minds, top docs in the family and also on the payroll and finally, a near army totaling over two hundred plus strategic sales soldiers. The firm is currently involved in an aggressive nationwide expansion with plans to open up two dozen luxe offices in 2008. According to the AMA there are over 800,000 physicians in the U.S. “Our mission is to impact the economic climate for physicians across the globe!” adds Coleman.

“Gyn Global leads the industry in delivering innovative, high end, yet cost effective solution packages with quick turn times. Physicians can count on our trusted advisors also known as Beautefessionals, to provide customized consultancy services, and serve as a one stop physician’s problem solving shop. No other company in the world even comes close to our expertise, background, swagger, results and significant research performed. ” says Coleman.

Additional fulfillment provided by the dynamic agency includes physicians’ legacy and literary project management, philanthropic opportunities, medical research, trademark, patents and invention management. Gyn Global boasts a world wide think tank of expert financiers, attorneys, physicians, entertainment execs and branding gurus.

Exclusive to the platform are the funding and social networking components for doctors by doctors. Red Carpet & Philanthropic Events compliment the Gyn Global scintillating networking roster for 2008. The Doctors Meet Investors network healthcare funding, is comprised of angel investors and venture capital firms that are focused on funding physicians’ endeavors, medical inventions, research, medical technology and other healthcare related platforms. This component also provides research, field studies, grants, business plan creation services for physicians and other related start up services including consulting, practice assessments, audits, medical billing, practice expansion, medical staffing, site selection, design and more.

For more information on the Gyn Global portfolio of services, rates, case studies, preceptorships in vaginal rejuvenation, cosmetic surgery training, healthcare consulting, subsidiaries, cosmetic surgery franchise opportunities or sponsorship opportunities please log onto http://www.gynglobal.com

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You know things must be getting bad for President Obama when a heavily left leaning Newsweek magazine (I’m not sure who actually reads that rag anymore) prints a cover that says, “Hit the Road Barack. Why we need a new president.” Even though the article is written by a conservative who used to work for the McCain campaign back in Election 2008, that’s pretty interesting that Newsweek would do this. Of course Newsweek, even though they are liberal, has never shied from controversy and this cover and article is certainly no different. In the article, author Niall Ferguson chronicles a pretty comprehensive list of President Obama’s promises and then the complete and utter failure to deliver on even a single one of those pledges. And on the things that President Obama has actually accomplished, such as Wall Street reform, if you want to call it that (but that’s a topic for another video), Stimulus Bills and even what Ferguson call Pelosicare, because it was Nancy Pelosi who pushed Obamacare through Congress, President Obama has ruled by suggestion. It was in fact Christopher Dodd and Barney Frank that created the monstrous Wall Street reform bill, Nancy Pelosi and her cabal that wrote the stimulus bills and Pelosi that rammed Obama’s healthcare plan through Congress because he couldn’t even pretend to be a leader on his own supposed bill. The article goes on and on to cover Obama’s abysmal failures in great detail and is so comprehensive, it is 5 pages long, I don’t see how
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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San Jose, Costa Rica (PRWEB) August 06, 2012

Once again, Costa Rica continues to amaze global leaders as the central bank on Tuesday raised its 2012 economic growth forecast for the second year in a row. The increase, 4.8 percent from the previous estimate 3.8 percent, is mainly due to strong activity and progress in the manufacturing and franchise sectors. Rodrigo Bolanos, president of the central bank, stated “This is due to growth in demand in both the external and internal markets”.

Furthermore, the bank predicts the inflation rate to rise to approximately 5 percent through the year 2013. This is due to a decision the central bank made in 2007 when they decided to float the col

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Corona, CA (PRWEB) July 12, 2012

Emcee Rick Bishop of WRCOG (Western Riverside Council of Governments) said, The economy is certainly in the tank right now but Western Riverside County continues to be one of the fastest growing areas in the United States.

Moderator Jeff Gibson, Occidental Communications and Chamber Advocate presented how California was the number one job producer among the states that run along the I-15 corridor (Utah, Nevada and Arizona). He said, Eighty one percent of the jobs that have been produced along that corridor in the last year have been produced in the state of California.

Corona was especially attractive for new businesses to take economic risks in and will continue to be because of its prime location, distribution infrastructure and easy access to the 91 and 15 freeways.

Positive signs that the economy was improving in the city of Corona was sited by Blankenship who said building permits for the first quarter of this year were almost as many as the total for last year, although he conceded that numbers were still low. Were already at 47 for this year…. but last year we were at 55 [for the entire year].

Blankenship also discussed the fact that housing prices are down nearly 60 percent in Riverside County. There’s never been a better time to buy a home, he said. But one of the hurdles the industry continues to face is the high cost of building. The city of Corona is one jurisdiction that has lowered its development impact fees. The [housing] industry has made big changes to be competitive in this market, Blankenship added.

Another major issue the panel addressed was the Annexation of Temescal Valley, which encompasses approximately 15 square miles with a population of about 15,000. Colleta explained the fiscal analysis and cost to revenue ratio the city must consider for annexation. She said, If the city actually annexed this land and was able to provide it with ample city services based on the revenue we expect to get from that, and if that fiscal comes back positive, thats really a good plan and we can actually provide some service out here and replace some of the services that are provided by Riverside County.

Currently, the city is working on educating the public on the annexation and Colleta was confident the community would be supportive.

Keynote speaker Zaremberg discussed how people no longer have confidence in their government and community and what could be done to help change that. He said, You have to be involved, we have to make a difference, and we have to have the right leaders. We have to have people who make job creation a priority.







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Waldorf, MD (PRWEB) January 17, 2012

The organizations proposal demonstrates the decrease in health care costs on a National level through the growth of their program, which mitigates alcohol-impaired driving. “The number of fatal crashes and injuries in the U.S. related to alcohol-impaired driving effectuates increases in health care costs, insurance costs, and decreases medicare efficiency.” Seanna Smallwood explained. They have developed a capacity building designated driver program which models that of NHTSA guidelines for Highway Safety, thus, affords participating States the opportunity to procure funds through the Federal NHTSA grant.

The program has expanded to Colorado, Delaware, Virginia, Louisiana, California, and of course, throughout their ‘home State’ of Maryland. Could the U.S. economy actually recover from its deficit with a program [such as this] that offers a solution to a problem that costs Americans $ 1.73 million per person killed? If the Will Be Designated Driver program is properly funded as outlined in the program budget, the end-result could be an average of $ 46,068,170,000 American Dollars saved per year.

In preparing their funding proposals and procurement of National-level Corporate Sponsors for each State and County in which they serve – on task for launching a total of twenty States in 2012, research shows a possible economic recovery with the simple, life-saving program. The analysis shows the Federal Government throwing bad dollars after good dollars in a safe recovery plan. Smallwood explains, “When carefully analyzing where Federal monies are spent contributing to deficits, finding a solution to any problem that assists in an economic crisis is the fundamental starting point for such recovery.”

According to NHTSA data, alcohol related crashes cost Americans $ 46 billion per year. When that number is broken down, a determination that alcohol-impaired driving costs American Government/tax-payers and business approximately $ 1.73 million per death (The Highway Safety Desk Book, 2003). NHTSA also reports drunken driving crashes are a leading cause of death among young people in the U.S.

Between 1982 and 1993, drunken driving caused 266,291 deaths this means, every 30 minutes, someone lost their life during that 10-year span (The Highway Safety Desk Book, 2003). In 2003, NHTSA reported approximately 275,000 people were injured due to an alcohol related accident, (NHTSA, 2009). The entire United States of America, every State, and every County, city, and municipal government should be alarmed at these numbers.

Every business in the following industries should partake in this proposed solution, as each category is affected by just one alcohol related crash fatality: Life Insurance payouts, Auto Insurance/PIP payouts, Unpaid Hospitals/ER bills, Emergency Response Management (time and hours), Disability Insurance Organizations and Members payouts, administrative processing, Medicare payouts, administrative processing, Courts and Administration, Jails (State and County Detention Centers), inmates, food, housing expenses and even individual stakeholders in the personal economies of every citizen. Furthermore, WIC/Food Stamps and Cash Assistance Programs stakeholders are also effected.

Another alarming aspect of the [financial and economic] affects of alcohol-impaired driving is the disabilities catagory. Vehicular crashes impact the following disabilities: arthritis, herniated discs, back pain, paralysis, fractures, sprains, strains, dislocations, contusions, burns, allergic reactions, depression, drug/alcohol substance abuse, anxiety disorders, headaches, insomnia, coma, chronic fatigue, sleep apnea, hepatitis, meningitis, hernia, cirrhosis of the liver, dental disorders, temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJ), and other unclassified and undiagnosed categories. From the list, the only category that is likely NOT affected by alcohol impaired crashes is congenital anomalities, which only accounts for .4% of all approved claims in 2010 by the CDA (Council for Disability Awareness, 2011). The translation, 99.6% of all disability claims from the sample surveyed have approved disability claims from categories that potentially resulted from alcohol impaired driving crashes.

The need for viable options to avoid drinking and driving to be presented and readily available with a strong push from alcohol service establishments is imperative for persons that consume alcohol, and for the safety of each citizen in every community, County, and State. Alcohol and prescription drugs, although legal, impairs judgment. Several things occur while alcohol acts to depress the reticular activating system. First, the altering mechanism is depressed and a person does not become aware of potentially hazardous or dangerous situations that the sensory functions detect, (i.e, choosing to drive), as the sensory functions deteriorate and may not be supplying complete information to the brain, and in fact, any information is likely to be incorrect (Hangover Tips, 2011).

Second, a person’s motorized functions are impaired. Because of this, the person will feel less subdued and more self-confident about his/her driving skills. As a result, after having consumed alcohol, a person is more likely to drive and more likely to speed causing fatal situations which would normally be avoided, (Hangover Tips, 2011).

The economy is in such a state of dysfunction, especially among middle-class Americans, the financial impact of funding this program is exponentially positive. Unfortunately, there are no viable solutions to sustaining such a program without Federal, State, and County assistance for the first few years. Sustainability after further program development is however, possible.

The ripple-effect: more people would qualify for more jobs, less people would be incarcerated, businesses and middle-class Americans would have more disposable income, etc. Will Be Designated Driver, Inc. has developed the solution.

Can community leaders, Sheriff Departments, Chambers of Commerce, Liquor Boards, National, Regional and County-level Corporate Giving, and independent stakeholders work together to ensure sustainability? This objective is the organization’s top priority for 2012.

###





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Waldorf, MD (PRWEB) January 17, 2012

The organizations proposal demonstrates the decrease in health care costs on a National level through the growth of their program, which mitigates alcohol-impaired driving. “The number of fatal crashes and injuries in the U.S. related to alcohol-impaired driving effectuates increases in health care costs, insurance costs, and decreases medicare efficiency.” Seanna Smallwood explained. They have developed a capacity building designated driver program which models that of NHTSA guidelines for Highway Safety, thus, affords participating States the opportunity to procure funds through the Federal NHTSA grant.

The program has expanded to Colorado, Delaware, Virginia, Louisiana, California, and of course, throughout their ‘home State’ of Maryland. Could the U.S. economy actually recover from its deficit with a program [such as this] that offers a solution to a problem that costs Americans $ 1.73 million per person killed? If the Will Be Designated Driver program is properly funded as outlined in the program budget, the end-result could be an average of $ 46,068,170,000 American Dollars saved per year.

In preparing their funding proposals and procurement of National-level Corporate Sponsors for each State and County in which they serve – on task for launching a total of twenty States in 2012, research shows a possible economic recovery with the simple, life-saving program. The analysis shows the Federal Government throwing bad dollars after good dollars in a safe recovery plan. Smallwood explains, “When carefully analyzing where Federal monies are spent contributing to deficits, finding a solution to any problem that assists in an economic crisis is the fundamental starting point for such recovery.”

According to NHTSA data, alcohol related crashes cost Americans $ 46 billion per year. When that number is broken down, a determination that alcohol-impaired driving costs American Government/tax-payers and business approximately $ 1.73 million per death (The Highway Safety Desk Book, 2003). NHTSA also reports drunken driving crashes are a leading cause of death among young people in the U.S.

Between 1982 and 1993, drunken driving caused 266,291 deaths this means, every 30 minutes, someone lost their life during that 10-year span (The Highway Safety Desk Book, 2003). In 2003, NHTSA reported approximately 275,000 people were injured due to an alcohol related accident, (NHTSA, 2009). The entire United States of America, every State, and every County, city, and municipal government should be alarmed at these numbers.

Every business in the following industries should partake in this proposed solution, as each category is affected by just one alcohol related crash fatality: Life Insurance payouts, Auto Insurance/PIP payouts, Unpaid Hospitals/ER bills, Emergency Response Management (time and hours), Disability Insurance Organizations and Members payouts, administrative processing, Medicare payouts, administrative processing, Courts and Administration, Jails (State and County Detention Centers), inmates, food, housing expenses and even individual stakeholders in the personal economies of every citizen. Furthermore, WIC/Food Stamps and Cash Assistance Programs stakeholders are also effected.

Another alarming aspect of the [financial and economic] affects of alcohol-impaired driving is the disabilities catagory. Vehicular crashes impact the following disabilities: arthritis, herniated discs, back pain, paralysis, fractures, sprains, strains, dislocations, contusions, burns, allergic reactions, depression, drug/alcohol substance abuse, anxiety disorders, headaches, insomnia, coma, chronic fatigue, sleep apnea, hepatitis, meningitis, hernia, cirrhosis of the liver, dental disorders, temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJ), and other unclassified and undiagnosed categories. From the list, the only category that is likely NOT affected by alcohol impaired crashes is congenital anomalities, which only accounts for .4% of all approved claims in 2010 by the CDA (Council for Disability Awareness, 2011). The translation, 99.6% of all disability claims from the sample surveyed have approved disability claims from categories that potentially resulted from alcohol impaired driving crashes.

The need for viable options to avoid drinking and driving to be presented and readily available with a strong push from alcohol service establishments is imperative for persons that consume alcohol, and for the safety of each citizen in every community, County, and State. Alcohol and prescription drugs, although legal, impairs judgment. Several things occur while alcohol acts to depress the reticular activating system. First, the altering mechanism is depressed and a person does not become aware of potentially hazardous or dangerous situations that the sensory functions detect, (i.e, choosing to drive), as the sensory functions deteriorate and may not be supplying complete information to the brain, and in fact, any information is likely to be incorrect (Hangover Tips, 2011).

Second, a person’s motorized functions are impaired. Because of this, the person will feel less subdued and more self-confident about his/her driving skills. As a result, after having consumed alcohol, a person is more likely to drive and more likely to speed causing fatal situations which would normally be avoided, (Hangover Tips, 2011).

The economy is in such a state of dysfunction, especially among middle-class Americans, the financial impact of funding this program is exponentially positive. Unfortunately, there are no viable solutions to sustaining such a program without Federal, State, and County assistance for the first few years. Sustainability after further program development is however, possible.

The ripple-effect: more people would qualify for more jobs, less people would be incarcerated, businesses and middle-class Americans would have more disposable income, etc. Will Be Designated Driver, Inc. has developed the solution.

Can community leaders, Sheriff Departments, Chambers of Commerce, Liquor Boards, National, Regional and County-level Corporate Giving, and independent stakeholders work together to ensure sustainability? This objective is the organization’s top priority for 2012.

###





Related Posts:

Who Cares? The Economic Value Of Love And Care

Those of us who were young in the fifties, sixties and seventies are now aging, and just as we tried in our youth to find alternative ways of living, learning, cooperating, having fun, and being productive, I think we’re destined to replay many of these scenarios in our old age, when creative independence and autonomy from centralized systems is likely to be the prescription for not just quality of life but survival itself. Being able to explore personal options for healing without interference from the government, and being able to form communities in which love and care are among the most valued and best compensated of human resources, seem to me to be very closely connected alternative lifestyles.

Any one of us not in need at this moment could, before the sun rises again, find our entire life changed with our independence and abilities gone forever. It happens every day. Yet, when such a terrible thing happens, we are like animals struck dumb by a nameless shadow of terror from the sky. And if we did not care for the awful fate suffered by others before us, we can really complain if we find ourselves lying alone in illness or old age without hope of love or mercy.

If we are as individual people to receive the kind of loving care which we would all hope to have when we are old or sick or desperately injured, we must as individuals who are yet whole, create and support a society which actively and imaginatively cares for its members in need.

Many of the social inventions in this book are driven by my observation that people who have the ability to love and care for others possess an economically valuable resource which is in great demand and short supply.

In practical terms social inventions are a lot like mechanical inventions. To be worth a second glance, they have to work, to do what they are supposed to do, and to do it dependably and cost-effectively. They have to meet real needs or create and fill new ones, fit in with people’s existing lives, and give perceived value.

There are lots of other possible criteria, but for a social invention there are only two that count – it has to work, and be relevant. And that’s where the mechanical inventor and the social inventor take different paths. When you are building a machine you can get feedback. It works, or it doesn’t. You can test the validity of your invention – it either works or it doesn’t. If it works, you can set out to optimize it; if it doesn’t work, you try to fix the problem and go on, or you can decide that your idea won’t work and stop the bubble machine.

Social inventors rarely get a chance to see their inventions bench tested, let alone given a test run on a real track. It’s hard to build a model, much less a working model, since social inventions involve people as the basic “mechanism”, and only social inventors who happen to be kings, dictators, or very rich are able to create actual working (or non-working) models of their social inventions.

But just as technical or mechanical inventors aren’t stopped by the fact that the realistic prospect of a successful gadget or “million dollar” idea is very small, social inventors probably aren’t stopped just because its extremely unlikely that their work will ever receive formal recognition, much less be put to the actual test.

Social inventions begin with hubris and, if they are any good at all, end with humility. I offer these inventions not in the hubris of creation, but after many years of reflection. I humbly believe in their potential to make this world a better place for all of us, and I want to share them with others.

This book explores a number of closely related social inventions on the subject of the unrecognized but very real economic value of love and care, two of a small but precious number of valuable, scarce human capital resources which are unvalued in a world dominated by economies based on the possession and exploitation of labor, technology and material resources.
Those of us who were young in the fifties, sixties and seventies are now aging, and just as we tried in our youth to find alternative ways of living, learning, cooperating, having fun, and being productive, I think we’re destined to replay many of these scenarios in our old age, when creative independence and autonomy from centralized systems is likely to be the prescription for not just quality of life but survival itself. Being able to explore personal options for healing without interference from the government, and being able to form communities in which love and care are among the most valued and best compensated of human resources, seem to me to be very closely connected alternative lifestyles.

Any one of us not in need at this moment could, before the sun rises again, find our entire life changed with our independence and abilities gone forever. It happens every day. Yet, when such a terrible thing happens, we are like animals struck dumb by a nameless shadow of terror from the sky. And if we did not care for the awful fate suffered by others before us, we can really complain if we find ourselves lying alone in illness or old age without hope of love or mercy.

If we are as individual people to receive the kind of loving care which we would all hope to have when we are old or sick or desperately injured, we must as individuals who are yet whole, create and support a society which actively and imaginatively cares for its members in need.

Many of the social inventions in this book are driven by my observation that people who have the ability to love and care for others possess an economically valuable resource which is in great demand and short supply.

In practical terms social inventions are a lot like mechanical inventions. To be worth a second glance, they have to work, to do what they are supposed to do, and to do it dependably and cost-effectively. They have to meet real needs or create and fill new ones, fit in with people’s existing lives, and give perceived value.

There are lots of other possible criteria, but for a social invention there are only two that count – it has to work, and be relevant. And that’s where the mechanical inventor and the social inventor take different paths. When you are building a machine you can get feedback. It works, or it doesn’t. You can test the validity of your invention – it either works or it doesn’t. If it works, you can set out to optimize it; if it doesn’t work, you try to fix the problem and go on, or you can decide that your idea won’t work and stop the bubble machine.

Social inventors rarely get a chance to see their inventions bench tested, let alone given a test run on a real track. It’s hard to build a model, much less a working model, since social inventions involve people as the basic “mechanism”, and only social inventors who happen to be kings, dictators, or very rich are able to create actual working (or non-working) models of their social inventions.

But just as technical or mechanical inventors aren’t stopped by the fact that the realistic prospect of a successful gadget or “million dollar” idea is very small, social inventors probably aren’t stopped just because its extremely unlikely that their work will ever receive formal recognition, much less be put to the actual test.

Social inventions begin with hubris and, if they are any good at all, end with humility. I offer these inventions not in the hubris of creation, but after many years of reflection. I humbly believe in their potential to make this world a better place for all of us, and I want to share them with others.

This book explores a number of closely related social inventions on the subject of the unrecognized but very real economic value of love and care, two of a small but precious number of valuable, scarce human capital resources which are unvalued in a world dominated by economies based on the possession and exploitation of labor, technology and material resources.

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Related Posts:

Who Cares? The Economic Value Of Love And Care

Those of us who were young in the fifties, sixties and seventies are now aging, and just as we tried in our youth to find alternative ways of living, learning, cooperating, having fun, and being productive, I think we’re destined to replay many of these scenarios in our old age, when creative independence and autonomy from centralized systems is likely to be the prescription for not just quality of life but survival itself. Being able to explore personal options for healing without interference from the government, and being able to form communities in which love and care are among the most valued and best compensated of human resources, seem to me to be very closely connected alternative lifestyles.

Any one of us not in need at this moment could, before the sun rises again, find our entire life changed with our independence and abilities gone forever. It happens every day. Yet, when such a terrible thing happens, we are like animals struck dumb by a nameless shadow of terror from the sky. And if we did not care for the awful fate suffered by others before us, we can really complain if we find ourselves lying alone in illness or old age without hope of love or mercy.

If we are as individual people to receive the kind of loving care which we would all hope to have when we are old or sick or desperately injured, we must as individuals who are yet whole, create and support a society which actively and imaginatively cares for its members in need.

Many of the social inventions in this book are driven by my observation that people who have the ability to love and care for others possess an economically valuable resource which is in great demand and short supply.

In practical terms social inventions are a lot like mechanical inventions. To be worth a second glance, they have to work, to do what they are supposed to do, and to do it dependably and cost-effectively. They have to meet real needs or create and fill new ones, fit in with people’s existing lives, and give perceived value.

There are lots of other possible criteria, but for a social invention there are only two that count – it has to work, and be relevant. And that’s where the mechanical inventor and the social inventor take different paths. When you are building a machine you can get feedback. It works, or it doesn’t. You can test the validity of your invention – it either works or it doesn’t. If it works, you can set out to optimize it; if it doesn’t work, you try to fix the problem and go on, or you can decide that your idea won’t work and stop the bubble machine.

Social inventors rarely get a chance to see their inventions bench tested, let alone given a test run on a real track. It’s hard to build a model, much less a working model, since social inventions involve people as the basic “mechanism”, and only social inventors who happen to be kings, dictators, or very rich are able to create actual working (or non-working) models of their social inventions.

But just as technical or mechanical inventors aren’t stopped by the fact that the realistic prospect of a successful gadget or “million dollar” idea is very small, social inventors probably aren’t stopped just because its extremely unlikely that their work will ever receive formal recognition, much less be put to the actual test.

Social inventions begin with hubris and, if they are any good at all, end with humility. I offer these inventions not in the hubris of creation, but after many years of reflection. I humbly believe in their potential to make this world a better place for all of us, and I want to share them with others.

This book explores a number of closely related social inventions on the subject of the unrecognized but very real economic value of love and care, two of a small but precious number of valuable, scarce human capital resources which are unvalued in a world dominated by economies based on the possession and exploitation of labor, technology and material resources.
Those of us who were young in the fifties, sixties and seventies are now aging, and just as we tried in our youth to find alternative ways of living, learning, cooperating, having fun, and being productive, I think we’re destined to replay many of these scenarios in our old age, when creative independence and autonomy from centralized systems is likely to be the prescription for not just quality of life but survival itself. Being able to explore personal options for healing without interference from the government, and being able to form communities in which love and care are among the most valued and best compensated of human resources, seem to me to be very closely connected alternative lifestyles.

Any one of us not in need at this moment could, before the sun rises again, find our entire life changed with our independence and abilities gone forever. It happens every day. Yet, when such a terrible thing happens, we are like animals struck dumb by a nameless shadow of terror from the sky. And if we did not care for the awful fate suffered by others before us, we can really complain if we find ourselves lying alone in illness or old age without hope of love or mercy.

If we are as individual people to receive the kind of loving care which we would all hope to have when we are old or sick or desperately injured, we must as individuals who are yet whole, create and support a society which actively and imaginatively cares for its members in need.

Many of the social inventions in this book are driven by my observation that people who have the ability to love and care for others possess an economically valuable resource which is in great demand and short supply.

In practical terms social inventions are a lot like mechanical inventions. To be worth a second glance, they have to work, to do what they are supposed to do, and to do it dependably and cost-effectively. They have to meet real needs or create and fill new ones, fit in with people’s existing lives, and give perceived value.

There are lots of other possible criteria, but for a social invention there are only two that count – it has to work, and be relevant. And that’s where the mechanical inventor and the social inventor take different paths. When you are building a machine you can get feedback. It works, or it doesn’t. You can test the validity of your invention – it either works or it doesn’t. If it works, you can set out to optimize it; if it doesn’t work, you try to fix the problem and go on, or you can decide that your idea won’t work and stop the bubble machine.

Social inventors rarely get a chance to see their inventions bench tested, let alone given a test run on a real track. It’s hard to build a model, much less a working model, since social inventions involve people as the basic “mechanism”, and only social inventors who happen to be kings, dictators, or very rich are able to create actual working (or non-working) models of their social inventions.

But just as technical or mechanical inventors aren’t stopped by the fact that the realistic prospect of a successful gadget or “million dollar” idea is very small, social inventors probably aren’t stopped just because its extremely unlikely that their work will ever receive formal recognition, much less be put to the actual test.

Social inventions begin with hubris and, if they are any good at all, end with humility. I offer these inventions not in the hubris of creation, but after many years of reflection. I humbly believe in their potential to make this world a better place for all of us, and I want to share them with others.

This book explores a number of closely related social inventions on the subject of the unrecognized but very real economic value of love and care, two of a small but precious number of valuable, scarce human capital resources which are unvalued in a world dominated by economies based on the possession and exploitation of labor, technology and material resources.

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Who Cares? The Economic Value Of Love And Care

Those of us who were young in the fifties, sixties and seventies are now aging, and just as we tried in our youth to find alternative ways of living, learning, cooperating, having fun, and being productive, I think we’re destined to replay many of these scenarios in our old age, when creative independence and autonomy from centralized systems is likely to be the prescription for not just quality of life but survival itself. Being able to explore personal options for healing without interference from the government, and being able to form communities in which love and care are among the most valued and best compensated of human resources, seem to me to be very closely connected alternative lifestyles.

Any one of us not in need at this moment could, before the sun rises again, find our entire life changed with our independence and abilities gone forever. It happens every day. Yet, when such a terrible thing happens, we are like animals struck dumb by a nameless shadow of terror from the sky. And if we did not care for the awful fate suffered by others before us, we can really complain if we find ourselves lying alone in illness or old age without hope of love or mercy.

If we are as individual people to receive the kind of loving care which we would all hope to have when we are old or sick or desperately injured, we must as individuals who are yet whole, create and support a society which actively and imaginatively cares for its members in need.

Many of the social inventions in this book are driven by my observation that people who have the ability to love and care for others possess an economically valuable resource which is in great demand and short supply.

In practical terms social inventions are a lot like mechanical inventions. To be worth a second glance, they have to work, to do what they are supposed to do, and to do it dependably and cost-effectively. They have to meet real needs or create and fill new ones, fit in with people’s existing lives, and give perceived value.

There are lots of other possible criteria, but for a social invention there are only two that count – it has to work, and be relevant. And that’s where the mechanical inventor and the social inventor take different paths. When you are building a machine you can get feedback. It works, or it doesn’t. You can test the validity of your invention – it either works or it doesn’t. If it works, you can set out to optimize it; if it doesn’t work, you try to fix the problem and go on, or you can decide that your idea won’t work and stop the bubble machine.

Social inventors rarely get a chance to see their inventions bench tested, let alone given a test run on a real track. It’s hard to build a model, much less a working model, since social inventions involve people as the basic “mechanism”, and only social inventors who happen to be kings, dictators, or very rich are able to create actual working (or non-working) models of their social inventions.

But just as technical or mechanical inventors aren’t stopped by the fact that the realistic prospect of a successful gadget or “million dollar” idea is very small, social inventors probably aren’t stopped just because its extremely unlikely that their work will ever receive formal recognition, much less be put to the actual test.

Social inventions begin with hubris and, if they are any good at all, end with humility. I offer these inventions not in the hubris of creation, but after many years of reflection. I humbly believe in their potential to make this world a better place for all of us, and I want to share them with others.

This book explores a number of closely related social inventions on the subject of the unrecognized but very real economic value of love and care, two of a small but precious number of valuable, scarce human capital resources which are unvalued in a world dominated by economies based on the possession and exploitation of labor, technology and material resources.
Those of us who were young in the fifties, sixties and seventies are now aging, and just as we tried in our youth to find alternative ways of living, learning, cooperating, having fun, and being productive, I think we’re destined to replay many of these scenarios in our old age, when creative independence and autonomy from centralized systems is likely to be the prescription for not just quality of life but survival itself. Being able to explore personal options for healing without interference from the government, and being able to form communities in which love and care are among the most valued and best compensated of human resources, seem to me to be very closely connected alternative lifestyles.

Any one of us not in need at this moment could, before the sun rises again, find our entire life changed with our independence and abilities gone forever. It happens every day. Yet, when such a terrible thing happens, we are like animals struck dumb by a nameless shadow of terror from the sky. And if we did not care for the awful fate suffered by others before us, we can really complain if we find ourselves lying alone in illness or old age without hope of love or mercy.

If we are as individual people to receive the kind of loving care which we would all hope to have when we are old or sick or desperately injured, we must as individuals who are yet whole, create and support a society which actively and imaginatively cares for its members in need.

Many of the social inventions in this book are driven by my observation that people who have the ability to love and care for others possess an economically valuable resource which is in great demand and short supply.

In practical terms social inventions are a lot like mechanical inventions. To be worth a second glance, they have to work, to do what they are supposed to do, and to do it dependably and cost-effectively. They have to meet real needs or create and fill new ones, fit in with people’s existing lives, and give perceived value.

There are lots of other possible criteria, but for a social invention there are only two that count – it has to work, and be relevant. And that’s where the mechanical inventor and the social inventor take different paths. When you are building a machine you can get feedback. It works, or it doesn’t. You can test the validity of your invention – it either works or it doesn’t. If it works, you can set out to optimize it; if it doesn’t work, you try to fix the problem and go on, or you can decide that your idea won’t work and stop the bubble machine.

Social inventors rarely get a chance to see their inventions bench tested, let alone given a test run on a real track. It’s hard to build a model, much less a working model, since social inventions involve people as the basic “mechanism”, and only social inventors who happen to be kings, dictators, or very rich are able to create actual working (or non-working) models of their social inventions.

But just as technical or mechanical inventors aren’t stopped by the fact that the realistic prospect of a successful gadget or “million dollar” idea is very small, social inventors probably aren’t stopped just because its extremely unlikely that their work will ever receive formal recognition, much less be put to the actual test.

Social inventions begin with hubris and, if they are any good at all, end with humility. I offer these inventions not in the hubris of creation, but after many years of reflection. I humbly believe in their potential to make this world a better place for all of us, and I want to share them with others.

This book explores a number of closely related social inventions on the subject of the unrecognized but very real economic value of love and care, two of a small but precious number of valuable, scarce human capital resources which are unvalued in a world dominated by economies based on the possession and exploitation of labor, technology and material resources.

List Price: $ 1.00

Price: $ 1.00

Related Posts:

Who Cares? The Economic Value Of Love And Care

Those of us who were young in the fifties, sixties and seventies are now aging, and just as we tried in our youth to find alternative ways of living, learning, cooperating, having fun, and being productive, I think we’re destined to replay many of these scenarios in our old age, when creative independence and autonomy from centralized systems is likely to be the prescription for not just quality of life but survival itself. Being able to explore personal options for healing without interference from the government, and being able to form communities in which love and care are among the most valued and best compensated of human resources, seem to me to be very closely connected alternative lifestyles.

Any one of us not in need at this moment could, before the sun rises again, find our entire life changed with our independence and abilities gone forever. It happens every day. Yet, when such a terrible thing happens, we are like animals struck dumb by a nameless shadow of terror from the sky. And if we did not care for the awful fate suffered by others before us, we can really complain if we find ourselves lying alone in illness or old age without hope of love or mercy.

If we are as individual people to receive the kind of loving care which we would all hope to have when we are old or sick or desperately injured, we must as individuals who are yet whole, create and support a society which actively and imaginatively cares for its members in need.

Many of the social inventions in this book are driven by my observation that people who have the ability to love and care for others possess an economically valuable resource which is in great demand and short supply.

In practical terms social inventions are a lot like mechanical inventions. To be worth a second glance, they have to work, to do what they are supposed to do, and to do it dependably and cost-effectively. They have to meet real needs or create and fill new ones, fit in with people’s existing lives, and give perceived value.

There are lots of other possible criteria, but for a social invention there are only two that count – it has to work, and be relevant. And that’s where the mechanical inventor and the social inventor take different paths. When you are building a machine you can get feedback. It works, or it doesn’t. You can test the validity of your invention – it either works or it doesn’t. If it works, you can set out to optimize it; if it doesn’t work, you try to fix the problem and go on, or you can decide that your idea won’t work and stop the bubble machine.

Social inventors rarely get a chance to see their inventions bench tested, let alone given a test run on a real track. It’s hard to build a model, much less a working model, since social inventions involve people as the basic “mechanism”, and only social inventors who happen to be kings, dictators, or very rich are able to create actual working (or non-working) models of their social inventions.

But just as technical or mechanical inventors aren’t stopped by the fact that the realistic prospect of a successful gadget or “million dollar” idea is very small, social inventors probably aren’t stopped just because its extremely unlikely that their work will ever receive formal recognition, much less be put to the actual test.

Social inventions begin with hubris and, if they are any good at all, end with humility. I offer these inventions not in the hubris of creation, but after many years of reflection. I humbly believe in their potential to make this world a better place for all of us, and I want to share them with others.

This book explores a number of closely related social inventions on the subject of the unrecognized but very real economic value of love and care, two of a small but precious number of valuable, scarce human capital resources which are unvalued in a world dominated by economies based on the possession and exploitation of labor, technology and material resources.
Those of us who were young in the fifties, sixties and seventies are now aging, and just as we tried in our youth to find alternative ways of living, learning, cooperating, having fun, and being productive, I think we’re destined to replay many of these scenarios in our old age, when creative independence and autonomy from centralized systems is likely to be the prescription for not just quality of life but survival itself. Being able to explore personal options for healing without interference from the government, and being able to form communities in which love and care are among the most valued and best compensated of human resources, seem to me to be very closely connected alternative lifestyles.

Any one of us not in need at this moment could, before the sun rises again, find our entire life changed with our independence and abilities gone forever. It happens every day. Yet, when such a terrible thing happens, we are like animals struck dumb by a nameless shadow of terror from the sky. And if we did not care for the awful fate suffered by others before us, we can really complain if we find ourselves lying alone in illness or old age without hope of love or mercy.

If we are as individual people to receive the kind of loving care which we would all hope to have when we are old or sick or desperately injured, we must as individuals who are yet whole, create and support a society which actively and imaginatively cares for its members in need.

Many of the social inventions in this book are driven by my observation that people who have the ability to love and care for others possess an economically valuable resource which is in great demand and short supply.

In practical terms social inventions are a lot like mechanical inventions. To be worth a second glance, they have to work, to do what they are supposed to do, and to do it dependably and cost-effectively. They have to meet real needs or create and fill new ones, fit in with people’s existing lives, and give perceived value.

There are lots of other possible criteria, but for a social invention there are only two that count – it has to work, and be relevant. And that’s where the mechanical inventor and the social inventor take different paths. When you are building a machine you can get feedback. It works, or it doesn’t. You can test the validity of your invention – it either works or it doesn’t. If it works, you can set out to optimize it; if it doesn’t work, you try to fix the problem and go on, or you can decide that your idea won’t work and stop the bubble machine.

Social inventors rarely get a chance to see their inventions bench tested, let alone given a test run on a real track. It’s hard to build a model, much less a working model, since social inventions involve people as the basic “mechanism”, and only social inventors who happen to be kings, dictators, or very rich are able to create actual working (or non-working) models of their social inventions.

But just as technical or mechanical inventors aren’t stopped by the fact that the realistic prospect of a successful gadget or “million dollar” idea is very small, social inventors probably aren’t stopped just because its extremely unlikely that their work will ever receive formal recognition, much less be put to the actual test.

Social inventions begin with hubris and, if they are any good at all, end with humility. I offer these inventions not in the hubris of creation, but after many years of reflection. I humbly believe in their potential to make this world a better place for all of us, and I want to share them with others.

This book explores a number of closely related social inventions on the subject of the unrecognized but very real economic value of love and care, two of a small but precious number of valuable, scarce human capital resources which are unvalued in a world dominated by economies based on the possession and exploitation of labor, technology and material resources.

List Price: $ 1.00

Price: $ 1.00

Related Posts: