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Issa probes talks between White House, IRS on healthcare law
Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) questioned Wednesday whether the White House pushed the IRS to implement President Obama's healthcare law in a way Issa believes is illegal. Issa, chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, believes the …
Read more on The Hill (blog)

Calif. bill would lower cost of chemotherapy pills
Health providers, including Kaiser Permanente, have warned that the bill could lead to an increase health care prices and premiums. The California Chamber of Commerce and other business groups said the private sector has to bear the costs of mandated …
Read more on ModernHealthcare.com

Medicare project linked to health law takes next step
The four-year project will be administered by the Medicare agency's Innovation Center, a creation of the 2010 healthcare law that seeks to reduce costs and improve healthcare delivery. The center's latest effort aims to foster well coordinated primary …
Read more on The Hill (blog)

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Question by : Why cant democrats distinguish between a massive health care law and an employee benefit?
The act of becoming a Senator or Representative is an occupation

We have had health care based on employment for decades

Why do democrats keep yelling about the health care of senators and the vote to repeal health care. So what if a republican takes their BENEFIT from their job and still want to kill a badly passed, badly written, hack piece of legislation?

One is how we have always have done things, and the health care law is a massive government expansion into our lives

They are totally separate, i guess they think it sounds good?

Best answer:

Answer by scott b
The way we “always have done things” doesn’t WORK. That’s the whole point.

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

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Question by Gods bless the USA A.R.T.: Can you think of any other similarities between civil rights and health care reform?
I can think of 2 major ones:

1. They are/were both opposed by the majority.

2. They are/were both the “right”, and moral thing to do.

It seems like the civil rights battle would have taught America that what is popular is not always the right thing to do, but apparently in America we are not fond of learning from our past mistakes.

After all, Conservatives seem intent on obeying the will of the majority in such matters as health care reform and homosexual marriage, even though the majority is not concerned with the best result for those involved.

Best answer:

Answer by as.erwin
If health care is a “right”, then why would you want the government having any administration over it? If they GIVE it to you, they can take it away, and thus… it is not a right.

Add your own answer in the comments!

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Understanding Health Care Reform: Bridging the Gap Between Myth and Reality

After nearly a year of debate, in March 2010, Congress passed and the president signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to reform the U.S. health care system. The most significant social legislation since the civil rights legislation and the creation of Medicare and Medicaid, the bill’s passage has been met with great controversy. Political pundits, politicians, health care economists, and policy analysts have filled the airwaves and the lay press with their opinions, but little has been heard from those who have the most invested in health care delivery reform—patients and their doctors.

Understanding Health Care Reform: Bridging the Gap Between Myth and Reality provides readers with the information to make informed decisions and to help counter the bias of political pundits and the influence of the for-profit health care industry. The author introduces readers to a group of dedicated doctors, administrators, and patients whose experiences illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of the health care reform legislation. He also shares his own experiences as both a physician and a patient.

The book puts the health care reform legislation in perspective by exploring ten critical areas:

  • The private insurance industry
  • Medicare and Medicaid
  • The elimination of waste caused by overutilization, high administrative fees, and fraud
  • Disease prevention and wellness programs
  • Care for the underserved—the health care “safety net”
  • Quality of care
  • The impending workforce shortage
  • Comparative-effectiveness research to compare treatments
  • Changes in the way medicine is practiced
  • Tort reform

Describing the reform act as the foundation and framing of a house, it outlines what doctors, patients, and families must focus on as states, the federal government, and the courts craft this legislation over time.

The author cuts through the political rhetoric to address the core question: how do we preserve our ability to provide the best possible care for patients and fulfill our societal mission of providing care for our citizens independent of their financial means? Focusing on strengths and weaknesses, rather than what is right or wrong, he encourages readers to think creatively about their role in establishing a better system of health care in America.

List Price: $ 39.95

Price: $ 37.91

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Understanding Health Care Reform: Bridging the Gap Between Myth and Reality

After nearly a year of debate, in March 2010, Congress passed and the president signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to reform the U.S. health care system. The most significant social legislation since the civil rights legislation and the creation of Medicare and Medicaid, the bill’s passage has been met with great controversy. Political pundits, politicians, health care economists, and policy analysts have filled the airwaves and the lay press with their opinions, but little has been heard from those who have the most invested in health care delivery reform—patients and their doctors.

Understanding Health Care Reform: Bridging the Gap Between Myth and Reality provides readers with the information to make informed decisions and to help counter the bias of political pundits and the influence of the for-profit health care industry. The author introduces readers to a group of dedicated doctors, administrators, and patients whose experiences illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of the health care reform legislation. He also shares his own experiences as both a physician and a patient.

The book puts the health care reform legislation in perspective by exploring ten critical areas:

  • The private insurance industry
  • Medicare and Medicaid
  • The elimination of waste caused by overutilization, high administrative fees, and fraud
  • Disease prevention and wellness programs
  • Care for the underserved—the health care “safety net”
  • Quality of care
  • The impending workforce shortage
  • Comparative-effectiveness research to compare treatments
  • Changes in the way medicine is practiced
  • Tort reform

Describing the reform act as the foundation and framing of a house, it outlines what doctors, patients, and families must focus on as states, the federal government, and the courts craft this legislation over time.

The author cuts through the political rhetoric to address the core question: how do we preserve our ability to provide the best possible care for patients and fulfill our societal mission of providing care for our citizens independent of their financial means? Focusing on strengths and weaknesses, rather than what is right or wrong, he encourages readers to think creatively about their role in establishing a better system of health care in America.

List Price: $ 39.95

Price: $ 37.91

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Question by Dean G: What is the difference between a policy and a mandate in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.?
I need to write a paper on either a policy or mandate associated with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) and I dont know the difference between the two. I also need a list of representatives who either voted for or against the PPACA and cant find an all inclusive list. Any help would be appreacated.

Best answer:

Answer by Do you really believe that drivel?
A policy is a course of action or a guiding principal.

A mandate is a command or an authorization.

What do you think? Answer below!

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Question by Dean G: What is the difference between a policy and a mandate in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.?
I need to write a paper on either a policy or mandate associated with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) and I dont know the difference between the two. I also need a list of representatives who either voted for or against the PPACA and cant find an all inclusive list. Any help would be appreacated.

Best answer:

Answer by Do you really believe that drivel?
A policy is a course of action or a guiding principal.

A mandate is a command or an authorization.

Give your answer to this question below!

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Alabama health officials are trying to determine whether organisms found at a pharmaceutical company precisely match bacteria that caused an infection outbreak at a half-dozen state hospitals.

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Question by Oh Well…: What are the differences between the December healthcare bill, and the one that just passed?
To my knowledge, the bill signed by Obama is the same bill that the Democrats tried to pass back in December… What really changed? I’d like a list of facts!

Best answer:

Answer by A Name Goes Right Here
Good luck. I’d like a rundown of what’s in the bill that passed as well as a breakdown of what it’s going to cost for citizens of varying income brackets and the government, but it’s such a massive, convoluted mess with spinsters slamming it on both sides that I doubt we’ll see any such thing.

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So I was wondering about healthcare in the States vs in Canada. This is in regards to Michael Moore’s film “Bowling for Columbine”. It seems that good healthcare is cheap if not free in Canada. So if a good healthcare system exists, whats the big deal with healthcare and the Obama administration? Why does it seem so hard for them to pass a bill on one? Can any Canadians out there shed some light on this?

*Note: also I know that Michael Moore sometimes doesn’t give viewers the whole picture, but thats why I’m looking for known facts. Thanks!

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